Avanti Travel Insurance blog

3 Feb

Travellers air views on flying fees

 

 Travellers air views on flying fees

Travellers air views on flying fees

Airline fees have historically been a common gripe among holidaymakers, particularly those that offer flights at an exceptionally low price before heaping countless ‘extras’ on top, such as those for baggage, printing a boarding pass and Ryanair’s aborted plans to charge passengers for spending a penny.

However, travellers have now fought back, airing their views in a survey published by Fly.com that indicated their requirements aren’t being met by the majority of airlines.

Unsurprisingly, excessive baggage fees came out at the top of gripes for the majority of participants, with 89 per cent saying it is important that companies stop charging for checked bags.

Despite this, it seems people are willing to pay for extras such as a dedicated overhead compartment for their luggage, and the chance for their suitcases to come out on the conveyor belt first at the end of the journey.

Travellers are also willing to shell out more cash for comfort and more space, although current aviation trends are seeing many airlines shrinking seats in order to squeeze more people onto the plane.

Almost half of those questioned (45 per cent) admitted they would pay for extra legroom while 26 per cent would be happy to pay premium if it meant they could have the seat next to them empty.

The survey also found that 40 per cent of travellers would like their meals to be complimentary for the duration of the flight.

“US airlines collected more than $2.5 billion from baggage fees during the first 9 months of 2013 alone,” commented Warren Chang, general manager of Fly.com.

“While lucrative, it is important that airlines balance profit against the needs and interests of their passengers,” he added.

No matter where you’re jetting off to, always ensure you have travel insurance as unexpected accidents can always crop up.

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